Pelvic Organ Prolapse Awareness

When I began my journey with pelvic health over eight years ago, I was one of the many women who had never heard of the condition pelvic organ prolapse or POP until I was living with the condition. POP, defined as the organs in the pelvic floor herniating into the vaginal canal affects approximately 50% of women in their lifetimes.1 Due to increased awareness every year, more and more women band together in efforts to share essential and life changing information as it relates to pelvic health.

Sherrie Palm, Founder of APOPS 
Association for Pelvic Organ Prolapse Support states, “June is POP Awareness Month, APOPS annual campaign to increase awareness of pelvic organ prolapse.” “Discovery upon diagnosis” is the norm for most women. Whether familiar with POP or not, women typically navigate symptoms they don’t understand for years, sometimes decades, before receiving accurate diagnosis and treatment. On medical record for over 4000 years but still shrouded in silence, POP impacts women physically, emotionally, socially, sexually, in their fitness regimens and in their employment. “Grassroots action generates change.”1

 In honour of POP Awareness Month here are three reasons why June is the perfect month to honour pelvic health.

  1. June is conducive for growth and development.

In the Northern Hemisphere, June represents the beginning of summer. It seems as if overnight the damper, cooler days of spring are over and we feel the warmth of the sun that is finally so much closer to the Earth. The celebration of the summer solstice on June 21st marks the longest day of the year. The energy of this time is a perfect balance of the action-oriented warmth of solar power generated by the sun and the reflective-oriented coolness of the moon. By tapping into both of these energies, a woman can take action this month to learn more about pelvic health from Pelvic Floor Physiotherapists as well as Fitness Experts who support the strengthening of the pelvic floor. A strong foundation of physical wellness is enhanced when we incorporate the reflective practice of truly listening to our bodies and knowing when to slow down and pay attention. Without the liminal and reflective spirit of our feminine nature, we cannot achieve true balance in our lives.

  1. Summer is the perfect time to establish self-care and health rituals.

One of the most important pieces of information a woman can have is the optimization of physical health through fitness-based activities that both support and strengthen the pelvic floor. When we look at the patterns found nature such as the cycle of birds it is apparent that birds are at the pinnacle of productivity throughout the month of June. We often see young birds taking flight, a culmination of the nurturing they have received, as they are now strong enough for independence and the next phase of their lives. It is expected that June is the month when bees’ honey will begin to flow. There is an overriding theme of preparation for the time ahead. Drawing on the productive energy of June can enhance the potential of beginning a self-care regime, particularly when we join forces with those who support us along the way paving the way for a stronger and healthier future.

  1. The symbolism associated with June is brightness and radiance.

The pelvic floor is connected with the root chakra or energy centre of the body representative of our place in the world. A strong root is equated with a solid foundation in the world; a source of energy flows into all other areas. Similar to a tree that emerges from strong roots in the earth there is nothing more strong and beautiful than a radiant woman. A woman who cares for herself by honouring not only her emotional and spiritual core essence but also the strength of her physical core is a force in the world and the world needs strong and empowered women to be of service. The month’s long days serves as a reminder to maintain and nourish our energy so that we glow from the inside out. June is a time to celebrate our light. Ultimately, June provides a medley of inspiration for vibrancy and growth.

Create strong roots and flourish.  Accept the month of June’s invitation to honour your pelvic health.

References

Palm, S. J. (2009). Pelvic organ prolapse: The silent epidemic. New York: Eloquent Books.

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Keira Brown
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Keira Wetherup Brown is a Certified Coach Practitioner and Teacher empowering mothers to reclaim health, joy, and grace in their lives. Overcoming life’s challenges including living with the condition of pelvic organ prolapse after the birth of her daughters and viewing them as gifts of self discovery and personal transformation has led to her commitment to illuminating a path of well being and health for women. Keira is passionate about sharing her journey to help other women who are on a similar journey.
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  • Chris Winter

    I (like many others I suspect) did not realise that this was such a common problem. I have been very reluctant to seek medical advice as GP knowledge is likely to be limited, referrals long and traumatic and solutions likely to be ‘surgery’. And once the surgeon gets in there EVERYTHING falls apart. Its a bit late for pelvic floor exercises, thought I know they are always good. Any thoughts about other ‘solutions’?

    • Hi Chris
      Thank you so much for taking the time to share. You have highlighted the journey of many women who live with pelvic health issues such as pelvic organ prolapse. I believe in a mind, body, and spirit approach to pelvic health. In my experience, while there can be setbacks as we move forward to heal such as piecing together medical advice from your GP and seeing a specialist the medical path can provide valuable information to inform our decisions as we move forward. That being said, complementing the medical pathway with a holistic approach including pelvic floor physiotherapy and exercise programs that support the pelvic floor are essential. I don’t think it is ever too late. Since pelvic health impacts all areas of a woman’s life my contribution to this approach is emotional support serving the mind and spirit. In essence I support and guide women throughout their healing journey which is often one of re-defining and re-establishing their lives. I wish you all the best as you continue to gather solutions. Warmly, Keira

    • Hi Chris

      Thank you so much for taking the time to share. You have highlighted
      the journey of many women who live with pelvic health issues such as
      pelvic organ prolapse. I believe in a mind, body, and spirit approach
      to pelvic health. In my experience, while there can be setbacks as we
      move forward to heal such as piecing together medical advice from your
      GP and seeing a specialist the medical path can provide valuable
      information to inform our decisions as we move forward. That being
      said, complementing the medical pathway with a holistic approach
      including pelvic floor physiotherapy and exercise programs that support
      the pelvic floor are essential. I don’t think it is ever too late. Since
      pelvic health impacts all areas of a woman’s life my contribution to
      this approach is emotional support serving the mind and spirit. In
      essence I support and guide women throughout their healing journey which
      is often one of re-defining and re-establishing their lives. I wish
      you all the best as you continue to gather solutions. Warmly, Keira

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